Wednesday, April 23, 2014
astonishing-moments:

Agnieszka Kukawska

astonishing-moments:

Agnieszka Kukawska

cacaotree:

Koen van den Broek

cacaotree:

Koen van den Broek

(Source: figgevonrosen.com)

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

jogoraz:

Jogo-z

Condemned windows

Monday, April 21, 2014
blastedheath:

Håkan Rehnberg (Swedish, b. 1953), Insomnia, 2004. Oil on acrylic glass, 150 x 135 cm.

blastedheath:

Håkan Rehnberg (Swedish, b. 1953), Insomnia, 2004. Oil on acrylic glass, 150 x 135 cm.

barymantan:

con/verse_14

barymantan:

con/verse_14

scandinaviancollectors:

Amédée Cortier (Belgian, 1921-1976), Composition, c.1960s.

scandinaviancollectors:

Amédée Cortier (Belgian, 1921-1976), Composition, c.1960s.

(Source: regardintemporel)

Ten Objects in Search of a Still Life (l’ora del bagno in Casa Morandi)

Jeffrey Earp  -  2014

Ten Objects in Search of a Still Life (l’ora del bagno in Casa Morandi)

Jeffrey Earp - 2014

Sunday, April 20, 2014
Barnett Newman

Cathedra  -  1951

Barnett Newman

Cathedra - 1951

Barnett Newman

The Wild  (detail)  -  1950

Barnett Newman

The Wild (detail) - 1950

Mr. Bacon & the Eggmen

Jeffrey Earp  -  2014

Mr. Bacon & the Eggmen

Jeffrey Earp - 2014

artemisdreaming:

.
Great works of art in all cultures succeed in capturing within the constraints of their form both the pathos of anguish and a vision of its resolution. Take, for example, the languorous sentences of Proust or the haiku of Basho, the late quartets and sonatas of Beethoven, the tragicomic brushwork of Sengai or the daunting canvases of Rothko, the luminous self-portraits of Rembrandt and Hakuin. Such works achieve their resolution not through consoling or romantic images whereby anguish is transcended. They accept anguish without being overwhelmed by it. They reveal anguish as that which gives beauty its dignity and depth.

.
~Stephen Batchelor (Buddhism without Beliefs)  
Image:  No. 4, 1964, National Gallery of Art, Mark Rothko

artemisdreaming:

.

Great works of art in all cultures succeed in capturing within the constraints of their form both the pathos of anguish and a vision of its resolution. Take, for example, the languorous sentences of Proust or the haiku of Basho, the late quartets and sonatas of Beethoven, the tragicomic brushwork of Sengai or the daunting canvases of Rothko, the luminous self-portraits of Rembrandt and Hakuin. Such works achieve their resolution not through consoling or romantic images whereby anguish is transcended. They accept anguish without being overwhelmed by it. They reveal anguish as that which gives beauty its dignity and depth.

.

~Stephen Batchelor (Buddhism without Beliefs)  

Image:  No. 4, 1964, National Gallery of Art, Mark Rothko

Saturday, April 19, 2014
father-son

Jeffrey Earp  -  2014

father-son

Jeffrey Earp - 2014